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Webinars

Register for an upcoming webinar using the links below or watch a recently archived webinar and download related resources.

Upcoming Webinars

May
03

Mental Health Clinical Care - Use of PrEP for Clients at High Risk of HIV

Wednesday, May 5, 2017 1:00 - 2:30 PM EDT

Despite significant advances in HIV prevention and care for people living with HIV/AIDS in the U.S., the rate of new infections has remained at approximately 50,000 over many years.  In an effort to decrease new infections, groundbreaking scientific work has expanded the use of antiretroviral medications for individuals at high risk for HIV to prevent infection - pre exposure prophylaxis (PrEP).

This webinar will include a review of the literature on PrEP; the rationale and indications for prescription use and current recommendations; its efficacy, the risk for compensatory behaviors, and reducing risk for other sexually transmitted infections (STI).  The webinar will also demonstrate and discuss the unique role for mental health providers in the use of PrEP.

Learning objectives:

  1. Describe the evidence-base that supports the efficacy of PrEP
  2. Understand key characteristics of individuals who may benefit from PrEP and identify certain factors of individuals who may not benefit from PrEP
  3. Discuss potential barriers to the use of PrEP and identify strategies to help patients overcome barriers
  4. List strategies that mental health providers canPrs employ to engage patients in conversations regarding the pros, cons and potential outcomes of proper PrEP use

The American Psychiatric Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The APA designates this live activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

For more information, contact Roke Iko at aids@psych.org.

Presenter: 

Kenneth Ashley, M.D. is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychiatry at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Clinician/Educator track) and Co-Director of Mental Health Services in the Peter Krueger Center for Immunological Disorders at Mount Sinai Beth Israel Hospital, a division of the Institute for Advanced Medicine.  Dr. Ashley is also an attending psychiatrist in the Division of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatic Medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel. 

Dr. Ashley graduated from Stanford University, received his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College, completed his psychiatric residency training at Beth Israel Medical Center, then he completed a two year research fellowship in C-L Psychiatry/Psychosomatic Medicine at Beth Israel Medical Center and NYU Medical School/Bellevue Hospital Center.

Dr. Ashley is board certified in General Psychiatry and Psychosomatic Medicine. In addition to his clinical responsibilities, Dr. Ashley teaches and mentors Psychosomatic Medicine fellows, Psychiatric residents, and medical students. At Mount Sinai Beth Israel Dr. Ashley is a member of the Ethics Committee, Co-Chair of the LGBT Employee Resource Group, and a member of the Diversity Council.

Dr. Ashley is a Distinguished Fellow of the APA and alumni of the APA/NIMH Minority Fellowship. He has been active in the APA at both the local (NY County Psychiatric Society-NYCPS) and the national levels. He is the former President of the NYCPS, a current Assembly Representative, and active on various committees, including the LGBT Issues and AIDS Committees. At the national level he has been involved with both the Committee on GLB Issues and is a member of the AIDS Committee/APIRE (American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education) HIV Psychiatry Steering Committee, as well as a Site Director for the APA Minority Medical Student HIV Psychiatry elective. 

He is the former President of the Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists and the Society for Liaison Psychiatry, the New York metro area component of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine (APM). He is a Senior Fellow of the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry (GAP) and member of the LGBT Committee, and a member of the Executive Council of the World Psychiatric Association (WPA) Section on HIV/AIDS.

Dr. Ashley has presented on issues in HIV, LGBT, and cultural diversity both nationally and internationally, as well as written on these issues. 

Archived Webinars

LGBTQ Youth and Homelessness: Opportunities for Risk Reduction and HIV Prevention

Original air date: Wednesday, March 29, 2017, 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM EDT

This webinar will address the current understanding of homelessness and its impact on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ) youth, ages 14-25 years old, in the U.S. With a focus on current research addressing the intersection of psychosocial, sociocultural, and socioeconomic factors that contribute to homelessness in youth, we will review how LGBTQ youth are a particularly vulnerable group for HIV risk, in comparison with their peers. Estimates suggest that 1.6-2 million youth live on the streets, in shelters, or in otherwise temporary accommodations and 25-55% identify as LGBTQ. Youth of color are disproportionally represented within the LGBTQ population experiencing homelessness and carry a heavier HIV burden. 

The goal of this interactive webinar is to engage those working in integrated care settings, health centers, shelter programs, community-based clinics, and hospitals in their role to improve mental health and psychosocial outcomes for LGBTQ youth, using empirically informed interventions. Areas of emphasis will include the consideration of gender and sexual identity in adolescence as significant risks for homelessness given economic and cultural factors across urban and rural environments; how homelessness increases the risk for poorer cognitive and behavioral outcomes, which can contribute to increased HIV risk; how adolescence and the move towards emerging adulthood are impacted by the experience of homelessness; and factors that contribute to resilience for these LGBTQ youths, highlighting how these protective factors can be engaged and promoted.

Participants will gain insight into the best options for supporting LGBTQ youths experiencing homelessness, particularly through culturally appropriate programming that can better promote self-efficacy and improved psychological and developmental outcomes.

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to identify the multiple factors that contribute to increased risk of homelessness among LGBTQ youth in the U.S., the cultural considerations that are necessary for making sense of these risks, and how these risks are exacerbated for LGBTQ youths experiencing homelessness.
  2. Participants will gain a better understanding of the intersection between psychosocial and socioeconomic factors that contribute to risk and resilience in LGBTQ youths who are homeless.
  3. Participants will attain knowledge about current approaches to intervention and support for LGBTQ youth who are homeless, particularly with regard to culturally sensitive, empirically supported programs and interventions that can promote protective factors, self-efficacy, and improve psychological and developmental outcomes, reducing HIV risk.

Continuing Education:

This webinar is being reviewed by the American Psychological Association’s Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (APA CEP) for 1.5 CEU hours. APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for this program and its content. 

If you wish to receive a Certificate of Attendance or continuing education credit from the APA, please contact David DeVito at ddevito@apa.org. Please title your message "Certificate of Attendance" or “CE Credit.”

Presenters:

Scott J. Hunter, Ph.D.

Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, and Pediatrics

The University of Chicago

Dr. Scott Hunter is Professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neuroscience, and Pediatrics, and Director of Neuropsychology at the University of Chicago.  Dual-trained in clinical child and developmental psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Dr. Hunter received his postdoctoral training in pediatric neuropsychology and neurodevelopmental disorders, as a LEND fellow, at the University of Rochester.  He has been on the faculty at the University of Chicago for 18 years, where he has engaged in clinical, academic, research, and administrative efforts. He is vice-chair of the UCM/BSD IRB and a faculty affiliate of the Center for Health and the Social Sciences (CHeSS).  Dr. Hunter is nationally respected for his clinical and research program that focuses on neurocognitive and behavioral development in both typically maturing and neurodevelopmentally disabled populations, with expertise in the cognitive and behavioral sequelae of socioeconomic disadvantage, prematurity and low birth weight, the autism spectrum disorders, pediatric sleep disorders, the epilepsies, neurofibromatosis, and HIV-infection.  He collaborates with colleagues both within UCM, as well as across the US, on research addressing the development and implementation of empirically supported assessment and treatment approaches to attention, memory, and executive dysfunction in underserved youth and adolescents, specifically those at risk for academic failure, substance abuse, and poor sexual decision making; and youth with neurodevelopmental and medical disorders.  He is the co-editor and co-author of several textbooks in developmental neuropsychology, and has published and presented widely on his research and clinical areas of focus, as a co-PI on a number of federally funded studies examining these issues.

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Navigating HIV and Hepatitis C Treatment with Clients Seeking Mental Health Services

Original air date: Wednesday, February 15, 2017, 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM EST

People at risk for HIV and/or hepatitis C (HCV) infection often seek mental health services for challenges that aren’t necessarily directly related to HIV or HCV; those living with or at risk for HIV/HCV may have other priorities they would rather address in a therapeutic setting.  Instead of outlining the mental health needs of people living with or at high risk for HIV and HCV, this presentation will discuss how HIV/HCV risk assessment and risk-reduction interventions may be integrated in more traditional approaches to psychotherapy.  It will outline reasons for and methods of including HIV/HCV risk assessment in initial evaluation and discuss how risk reduction interventions may be included in mental health treatment plans.

Learning objectives:

By the end of this training, participants will be able to:

  1. Articulate reasons for inclusion of a brief medical history, including a sexual history and testing for HIV and HCV, in the initial assessment of psychology patients/clients.
  2. Describe how HIV and HCV risk and testing history can be integrated into a psychological, psychosocial and brief medical history at the outset of treatment for mental health conditions.
  3. Discuss the roles of PrEP and TASP in HIV prevention and the reasons for including them in mental health care treatment plans when clients/patients have or are at risk for HIV infection.
  4. Develop a plan incorporating HIV/HCV risk reduction in an overall treatment plan inclusive of mental health.

This webinar has been reviewed and approved by the APA Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP).  APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

Trainer: David Martin, PhD

David J. Martin, PhD, ABPP, is a clinical psychologist in Washington DC, and former Senior Director of the APA Office on AIDS. Prior to APA, Dave worked at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center where he was Professor of Psychiatry (Medical Psychology) in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Director of HIV Mental Health Services, and Chief Psychologist and Training Director in the Psychology Division. He received his B.S. from the University of Washington, and his PhD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Martin completed internship and post-doctoral training at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, and he remains licensed as a psychologist in California. As director of Harbor-UCLA’s HIV Mental Health Program he oversaw coordination with primary-care providers, provision of mental health and psychiatric services for people with HIV/AIDS, and clinical supervision of post-doctoral fellows and field-placement students. As Chief Psychologist and Training Director, he oversaw a division of 14 psychologists, training activities for eight to 10 post-doctoral fellows in two APA-accredited psychology post-doctoral fellowship programs, and field-placement student activities for 28-37 students across 11 different service programs. 

Click here to access the feedback survey!

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Emergent Psychosocial Needs of Women Aging with HIV/AIDS: In Women's Voices

Original air date: Monday, December 5, 2016, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM EST

For the first time, many service providers are encountering older generations of clients living with HIV/AIDS. This includes more seniors who are newly diagnosed, and also those with years or decades of  experience managing their HIV and required medical treatment. The confluence of trauma; grief and loss; stigma and non-inclusion; social isolation, discrimination, comorbidities of normal aging; and managing the side-effects of complex medications can leave the aging population vulnerable to poor mental health outcomes on multiple levels.

In particular, women with HIV face unique gender- and age-related problems including earlier onset menopause, increased risk of certain cancers, a higher burden of caring-giving responsibilities, difficulty obtaining medical care and treatment, and dealing with additional social stigma.  Women living with HIV/AIDS experience a disproportionate burden of mental health issues including anxiety and depression, histories of trauma and abuse, posttraumatic stress and substance misuse.  This often results in decreased engagement and retention in care and reduced adherence to ART treatments.

With more people living with HIV into their senior years, there is both an urgency and opportunity to shape how mental and substance use disorder treatment services are delivered to older adults. Psychologists, social workers, psychiatrists, substance abuse counselors, and other front-line providers have a major role to play in the delivery of these services.

This webinar will highlight the experiences of women over 50 living with HIV, discuss the clinical implications and workforce gaps, and review a new toolkit aimed at training providers to recognize and address the specific needs of this population.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this webinar, participants will:

  1. Describe the social and clinical characteristics present among older women living with HIV
  2. Explore the stories of women aging with HIV, told directly by women about their experiences and what they need from mental health care providers
  3. Discuss with a mental health care provider, the opportunities and barriers to providing culturally competent and appropriate care for older adults living with HIV, and particularly women with HIV
  4. Review the HIV and Mental Health Training Resource Center’s “HIV and Aging Tookit” and demonstrate how to navigate through the toolkit’s written content, videos, and external resources

Presenters:

  • Erin Falvey, PhD, LMFT, Executive Director, Christie’s Place, San Diego, CA
  • Vanessa Johnson, JD, National Training and Leadership Director, Positive Women’s Network USA
  • Deborah McLean Leow, MSW, Project Director, Education Development Center, Inc.

This program is approved by NASW (886368156) for 1.5  Cross Cultural Social work continuing education credit hours.    The webinar is free of charge and CEUs will be made available through the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) for $45.00 (free CEUs to NASW members).

Click here to acccess the feedback survey!

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Integrated HIV Care & Treatment: A Medical Update and Case Example for Mental Health Professionals

Original air date: Thursday, September 8, 2016, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM EDT

Although effective treatments have made HIV infection a manageable chronic disease, many people living with HIV also present co-occurring mental disorders, and addictions. Medication adherence and other health behavior challenges can complicate treatment, highlighting the need for a skilled workforce (psychologists, social workers, psychiatrists, substance abuse counselors, and other front line providers) that can work collaboratively with health care and public-health professionals to respond to the psychosocial challenges that accompany having or being at risk for HIV. 

This webinar will highlight the latest in approaches to HIV prevention, care and treatment and provide a case example of how providers of medical and behavioral health can work together to improve outcomes for people living with HIV. 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to
1) Understand the latest medical approaches to HIV testing, and treatment and their impact on mental health and well-being. 
2) Explain the link between biomedical aspects of HIV with mental health, well-being and chronic disease management.
3) Identify the role mental health care provider’s play in linking people living with HIV/AIDS into care, and supporting adherence to medical regimens. 
4) Describe a case example of integrated care where medical and behavioral health care teams work together to improve outcomes for people living with HIV.

The webinar is free of charge.

This webinar has been reviewed and approved by the APA Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for this program and its content. The CE fee is $25.00 for this webinar.

Presenters:

Eugene Farber, PhD, ABPP, is Professor and Director of Psychology Internship Training, Emory University School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. 
Vincent C. Marconi, M.D., is Professor of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases and Professor of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University.

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Substance Use, HIV/AIDS and Mental Health: An Integrated Response

Original air date: Wednesday 31 August 2016, 01:00 PM - 02:30 PM EDT

Similarly to other chronic illnesses, living with HIV/AIDS may bring a heightened focus to a range of biological, psychosocial and spiritual issues in a client’s life. Some clients may have an identifiable health co-factor such as substance use, a substance use disorder or being in recovery, as well as other health or mental health concerns at the time of their diagnosis. For others, substance use might begin after an HIV diagnosis, or when they experience themselves slipping out of HIV treatment and care. As mental health care providers, it is critical to understand the syndemic nature of HIV/AIDS, mental wellness, and substance use, misuse and addiction. Further, we must be able to identify and address the existing structural barriers to behavioral health care for clients living with HIV/AIDS.

This webinar will use case studies and interactive exercises to provide an update on the current and emerging trends in substance use, and the treatment and assessment skills needed for an integrative response to the concerns of HIV, substance use, and mental health. Geared primarily to social workers in micro, macro and mezzo settings, any mental health care provider serving in a therapeutic role will benefit from this engaging event.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

1. Describe the common risk factors that may link HIV/AIDS, substance use, and mental health status

2. Identify the current trends in substance use and related risk 

3. Understand the biological, psychosocial, spiritual and behavioral aspects of substance use and HIV/AIDS

4. List the tools available to help clients assess for sexual health, substance use, and HIV/AIDS risk

5. Identify and understand harm reduction techniques 

6. Ascertain resources that will support social work practice at the micro, macro, and mezzo levels of practice

This webinar is presented free of charge.

After completing the feedback form, you will be directed to the NASW website to complete a post-test for continuing education credits. If you need assistance with the post-test or certificates, please contact NASW for support: (800) 742-4089 Mon - Fri, 9:00 AM - 9:00 PM ET.

Presenters:

Jill Sabatine, MSW, MPH, is a licensed clinical social worker and has worked with people living with HIV since 1989.

David Fawcett PhD, LCSW, is a social worker, certified sex therapist and clinical hypnotherapist residing in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

Evelyn P. Tomaszewski, MSW, is Senior Policy Advisor at the National Association of Social Workers (NASW).

Find our Feedback Form here! 

(PLEASE NOTE: The link for the Feedback Form posted in the webinar recording is incorrect! The link in the handouts is correct.)

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Part 2: Innovative Approaches to Rural Mental Health Treatment and HIV

Original air date: Tuesday, August 30, 2016, 12:00pm-1:30pm EDT

This is part 2 of a two-part webinar series. 

This two-part webinar series will outline disparities in need and access to mental health services experienced by individuals living with HIV/AIDS in the rural United States, and highlight resources for optimizing access to care and treatment that is inclusive of mental health.  While people living with HIV/AIDS in rural and urban settings may have similar levels of total stress, AIDS-related stress, social support, and active and avoidance coping, populations in rural settings appear to have higher rates of risk for depressive disorders.  Further, barriers to care contribute to the disparate burden of untreated mental disorders. These barriers are commonly experienced as HIV-related stigma; long travel for care; and lack of transportation, HIV-trained medical practitioners, housing, mental health services, and substance use disorder treatment are all more likely in rural areas of the South, including the “Deep South” defined as Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia, Florida and Texas. 

Innovative ways of reaching rural patients are currently being developed and need to be scaled-up, particularly in the South.  Interventions including the use of tele-psychiatry as well as tele-psychotherapy (group and individual) and other on-line techniques for the treatment for mental disorders will be explored. 

Participants are encouraged to register for both sessions. Click here for resources from Part 1

At the end of this webinar series, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the mental health disparities that pertain to people living with HIV/AIDS in rural areas, particularly in the South.
  2. Identify the types of barriers to optimal HIV care that pertain to rural areas, particularly in the South.
  3. Seek out and utilize resources for mental health treatments that optimize HIV care and may be accessed in rural areas, including those in the South.

The second session will focus on innovative approaches to mental health treatment and HIV currently in use across the geographically diverse rural areas that could also be applied to the rural Deep South. Examples will include tele-psychiatry/tele-psychotherapy (group and individual) and online mental health treatment techniques.

Evaluations: After viewing the recording, please complete the feedback form: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/RuralMHTreatment/

View the recording

 

Part 1: Mental Health & HIV in the Rural South

Original air date: Tuesday, August 16, 2016, 1pm-2:30pm EDT

This is part 1 of a two-part webinar series. This webinar series will outline disparities in need and access to mental health services experienced by individuals living with HIV/AIDS in the rural United States, and highlight resources for optimizing access to care and treatment that is inclusive of mental health.  While people living with HIV/AIDS in rural and urban settings may have similar levels of total stress, AIDS-related stress, social support, and active and avoidance coping, populations in rural settings appear to have higher rates of risk for depressive disorders.  Further, barriers to care contribute to the disparate burden of untreated mental disorders. These barriers are commonly experienced as HIV-related stigma; long travel for care; and lack of transportation, HIV-trained medical practitioners, housing, mental health services, and substance use disorder treatment are all more likely in rural areas of the South, including the “Deep South” defined as Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia, Florida and Texas. 

Innovative ways of reaching rural patients are currently being developed and need to be scaled-up, particularly in the South.  Interventions including the use of tele-psychiatry as well as tele-psychotherapy (group and individual) and other on-line techniques for the treatment for mental disorders will be explored. 

Participants are encouraged to register for both sessions. Click here for resources from Part 2

At the end of this webinar series, participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the mental health disparities that pertain to people living with HIV/AIDS in rural areas, particularly in the South.
  2. Identify the types of barriers to optimal HIV care that pertain to rural areas, particularly in the South.
  3. Seek out and utilize resources for mental health treatments that optimize HIV care and may be accessed in rural areas, including those in the South.

This first session will focus on the mental health of people living with HIV in the rural “Deep South”, defined as Tennessee, South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Georgia, Florida and Texas. 

Dr. Goodkin will review the epidemiology of HIV, and explore the psychosocial challenges specific to the rural Deep South that may be driving the epidemic.

Evaluations: After viewing the recording, please complete the feedback form: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/MHHIVRuralSouth/  

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Harm Reduction Psychotherapy: Working to Reduce HIV Risk among Persons Who Actively Use Substances

This webinar will introduce participants to the history, principles, and fundamental clinical interventions of harm reduction psychotherapy (HRP). As an integrated, biopsychosocial model, HRP offers a comprehensive means of working with clients who present with substance use disorders, mental illness, trauma, and medical issues such as HIV. Including both the science and the spirit of harm reduction, this webinar can guide clinical assessment, decision making, and collaborative treatment planning. The goal of this webinar is to increase participants’ skills and willingness to use harm reduction therapy to reduce HIV transmission when working with persons who use substances.

At the end of this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the goals of harm reduction psychotherapy as they relate to HIV prevention
  • Describe how substance use can play a role in a client’s risk for HIV diagnosis
  • Apply harm reduction principles and strategies to a substance abuse case study
  • Identify community and federal resources to support harm reduction

This webinar is free of charge. Download the webinar transcript

This webinar has been reviewed and approved by the APA Office of Continuing Education in Psychology (CEP). APA CEP Office maintains responsibility for this program and its content. The CE fee is $25.00 for this webinar.

Evaluations: After viewing the recording, please complete the feedback form: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/harmreductionpff/

View the recording

 

The NHAS & Social Work Practice

Click on the links below to access the slides and webinar recording from our live event, which took place on April 13, 2016.

Summary: Using the 2020 update of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) as a framework, this session is intended to expand the knowledge and capacity of social workers and allied mental health providers to address the mental health and psychosocial issues confronting people living with and affected by HIV and AIDS. The 2016 Social Work Month theme “forging solutions out of challenges” reflects the historical role of social workers and allied mental health providers in working toward the NHAS goal of “Getting to Zero” for new HIV infections. With approximately 55,000 new HIV infections in the United States annually, the updated NHAS framework is a call to action. This webinar will provide a high-level overview of the updated NHAS, the HIV continuum of care and social work practice implications, and provide concrete recommendations on meeting the needs of clients, communities and the workforce. Participants should come prepared to share practice strategies and dialogue. 

At the end of this Webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the implications of the National HIV/AIDS Strategy on social work policy and practice
  • Discuss the latest evidence on HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention for individuals, families, and communities 
  • Describe the role of social work in addressing health inequities in HIV/AIDS care and behavioral health services
  • Identify assessment and intervention strategies across social work practice settings, for the HIV continuum of care

Presenters: Susan M. Gallego, MSSW, LCSW and Evelyn P. Tomaszewski, MSW

The webinar is free of charge. 

Evaluations: After viewing the recording, please complete the feedback form: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/NHAS/

CE CREDITS: To receive 1.5 social work CEs, please go to the NASW Professional Education and Training Center page: www.naswproed.org/. Log in or create an account. Click on Catalog and search word: HIV. Complete the online post-test. CE credits are $15.00 for members and $45.00 for non members. If you need assistance with the post test or certificates-- please contact NASW Member Services for support: 800-742-4089 Mon-Fri 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET or naswproed@naswdc.org. If you have any other questions, please email hivmentalhealth@edc.org.

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Transgender Health and HIV/AIDS

Click on the links below to access the slides and webinar recording from our live event, which took place on March 30, 2016.

Summary: Transgender people experience multiple health disparities, including mental health and HIV treatment. This webinar reviews the most recent literature documenting these disparities and their connection to experiences of transphobia—the discrimination, harassment, and violence often directed toward transgender people. We discuss frameworks for thinking about and addressing these disparities in health care provision for transgender people, including syndemic theory and the Model of Gender Affirmation. Examples and ideas foster gender-affirming and trauma-informed health care environments and relationships with transgender clients.

This workshop will help you:

  • Describe syndemic theory and how it relates to health disparities experienced by transgender people.
  • Discuss recent findings on mental health disparities experienced by transgender people, with a specific focus on depression, anxiety, and PTSD.
  • Identify factors that mediate the relationship between transphobia and poor mental health outcomes.
  • Consider applications of the Model of Gender Affirmation to one’s own approach to health care provision for transgender people.

Presenter Bio: Jae Sevelius, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist and Assistant Professor with the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies (CAPS) in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Sevelius leads several research projects at the Center of Excellence for Transgender Health to promote increased access to culturally competent health care for transgender people.

This webinar is FREE of charge.

Evaluations: After viewing the recording, please complete the feedback form: http://fluidsurveys.com/s/apatranshealth/

APA Book: Affirmative Counseling and Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender-Non conforming Clients. Coming in August 2016!

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ADHERE: Engaging Clients to Achieve Adherence

This interactive training session explores factors that promote and challenge adherence, from the framework of the HIV Continuum of Care, to help clients link to care, remain in care, reach viral suppression and promote wellness. We are providing the slides and webinar recording from our live event on September 1, 2015. 

Presenters: Melissa Sellevaag, LCSW, Evelyn P. Tomaszewski, MSW

Evaluations

After viewing the recording, please complete the feedback form:  http://fluidsurveys.com/s/apfftot/

After completing the feedback form, you will be directed to the NASW website to complete a post-test for CEU credits. The credits are free for members and $20.00 for non-members. 

If you need assistance with the post test or certificates-- please contact NASW Member Services for support: 800-742-4089 Mon-Fri 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. ET or naswproed@naswdc.org